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Computed Tomography — Artifacts and Limitations

  • C. M. Strother
  • F. N. Ranallo
  • D. R. Jacobson
  • P. A. Turski
  • W. Perman
Conference paper

Abstract

Ideally, a computed tomographic reconstruction portrays, for a particular x-ray energy, the linear attenuation value of the material being imaged. When this is achieved, the values for each element of the reconstruction will be independent of position in the slice and of the nature of the adjacent material, and the image is free of artifacts. Of course, in clinical practice this ideal is not achieved, and to one degree or another computed tomographic scans of the skull and brain are marred by artifacts.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. M. Strother
  • F. N. Ranallo
  • D. R. Jacobson
  • P. A. Turski
  • W. Perman

There are no affiliations available

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