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Combined Application of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) to Swirling Flows Under Compression

  • J. Volkert
  • C. Tropea
  • R. Domann
  • W. Hübner
Conference paper

Abstract

The velocity field of a strongly swirling flow has been examined using an LDA and PIV in combination. The PIV revealed an asymmetric component of the flowfield, in particular a movement of the swirl center away from the geometric center of the rotating cylinder. A statistical description of this asymmetric component has been developed, from which the apparent turbulence measured with an LDA has been estimated. These results are compared to the actual LDA measurements. The conclusion is that a large portion of the measured turbulence using a one point technique (LDA) can be attributed to this effect and can also explain the previously observed discrepancy between experiment and numerical simulation.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Volkert
    • 1
  • C. Tropea
    • 1
  • R. Domann
    • 1
  • W. Hübner
    • 1
  1. 1.Lehrstuhl für StrömungsmechanikUniversity of Erlangen-NürnbergGermany

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