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Histological Aspects of Sepsis-Induced Brain Changes in a Baboon Model

  • K. Zarkovic
  • N. Zarkovic
  • G. Schlag
  • H. Redl
  • G. Waeg
Conference paper

Abstract

Encephalopathy is one of the organ dysfunctions seen in critically ill patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) secondary to sepsis (defined as the systemic response to infection).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Zarkovic
  • N. Zarkovic
  • G. Schlag
  • H. Redl
  • G. Waeg

There are no affiliations available

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