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Meteorology — LEO (Low Earth Orbit) Missions

  • Herbert J. Kramer
Chapter

Abstract

Background:1155),1156),1157) DMSP is the meteorological long-term program of the US Department of Defense (DoD) which originated in the mid-1960s with the objective to collect and disseminate worldwide cloud cover data on a daily basis. DMSP was originally known as DSAP (Defense System Applications Program) and as DAPP (Defense Acquisition and Processing Program).1158) 1159)

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Herbert J. Kramer
    • 1
  1. 1.GilchingGermany

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