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Meteorology — GEO (Geosynchronous Earth Orbit) Missions

  • Herbert J. Kramer
Chapter

Abstract

Elektro-M-1 is the planned geostationary meteorological mission of Rosaviakosmos, a successor spacecraft to GOMS (also known as Elektro-1). The overall mission objectives are:
  • To provide multispectral imagery (hydro-meteorological data) of the atmosphere (including the cloud-covered sky) and of the Earth’s surface within the coverage region (visible disk) of the spacecraft

  • To collect heliospheric, ionospheric, and magnetospheric data

  • To provide the needed communication services for the transmission/exchange of all data with the ground segment

  • To provide the services of data collection for the DCPs (Data Collection Platforms) in the ground segment.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Herbert J. Kramer
    • 1
  1. 1.GilchingGermany

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