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BPMashup: Dynamic Execution of RESTful Processes

  • Xiwei Xu
  • Ingo Weber
  • Liming Zhu
  • Yan Liu
  • Paul Rimba
  • Qinghua Lu
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7759)

Introduction

While WS*-based Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is employed heavily in the enterprise application & integration space, end-user-oriented organizations such as Facebook, Google or Yahoo! adopted the REST paradigm. Web service ecosystems [1] have been established around web service offerings like social networking, where open platforms enable third-party developers to easily leverage the infrastructure provided by the social networks, to build web applications and plugged-in services for a massive user base. Such a web service ecosystem typically comprises a service provider opening up their product public service platform, a set of external value-added-resellers, and a community of users building and sharing customizations [2]. The lower layers of the traditional SOA-based WS* standards stack provide a loosely coupled infrastructure for Web service ecosystems. However, process layers on top of the standards stack introduce a comparatively tight coupling between the process logic and the WSDL interface definition [3], which tends to be brittle.

Keywords

Business Process Process Fragment BPEL Process Business Platform Rest Principle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiwei Xu
    • 1
  • Ingo Weber
    • 1
    • 2
  • Liming Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yan Liu
    • 3
    • 2
  • Paul Rimba
    • 1
    • 2
  • Qinghua Lu
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Software System Research GroupNICTAAustralia
  2. 2.School of Computer Science and EngineeringUNSWAustralia
  3. 3.Pacific Northwest National LaboratoryUSA

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