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The Bearing Capacity of Flexible Piles Under Combined Loads in Dense Sand

  • M. Jian
  • C. ZhaoEmail author
  • C. F. Zhao
  • W. Z. Wang
Conference paper
  • 1.9k Downloads
Part of the Springer Geology book series (SPRINGERGEOL)

Abstract

Pile foundations are often subjected to vertical and lateral loads and moments. The current design practices assume that the effect of these loads is independent of each other and hence the pile design is carried out separately for vertical and lateral loads. The ultimate bearing capacity of flexible single piles in sand has been researched by model test under various combinations of vertical load, horizontal load and moment. The results of the load test which contain of the curve of vertical load-settlement, horizontal load-displacement and the ultimate bearing capacity are presented in the form of Cartesian co-ordinates. The basic laws of the component of the combined loads are analyzed and the ultimate bearing capacity is compared with the theoretical estimates based on the test results. Reasonable agreement has been found between the observed and predicted ultimate bearing capacity of flexible piles.

Keywords

Flexible piles Combined load Ultimate bearing capacity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The present study was supported by Shanghai Pujiang Program (11PJ1410100), Kwang-Hua Fund for College of Civil Engineering, Tongji University, Innovation Program of Tongji Younger Scholar (2010KJ047) and the National Natural Science Foundation Project (project number: 40972180). The entire staff at the Key Laboratory of Geotechnical and Underground Engineering of the Ministry of Education in Tongji University are gratefully acknowledged for their cooperation.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Geotechnical EngineeringTongji UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Key laboratory of Geotechnical and Underground Engineering of Ministry of EducationTongji UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China

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