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Field Scale Phytoremediation of Soils Contaminated with Heavy Metals and Radionuclides and Further Utilization of the Plant Residues

  • Daniel Mirgorodsky
  • Lukasz Jablonski
  • Delphine Ollivier
  • Juliane Wittig
  • Sabine Willscher
  • Dirk Merten
  • Georg Büchel
  • Peter Werner
Part of the Springer Geology book series (SPRINGERGEOL)

Abstract

Phytoremediation is applied to a site in the former uranium mining area of Ronneburg in Eastern Thuringia, Germany, slightly contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides (HM/R). In a joint research project, remediation of HM/R-contaminated sites is investigated and concepts for the subsequent utilization of the contaminated plant residues are developed. To minimize HM/R-accumulation in soil and to reduce groundwater contamination a combination of phytostabilization and phytoextraction methods is applied and lysimeter experiments are performed to demonstrate the reduction of seepage water rate and load. The final utilization of HM/R loaded plant residues after harvests was studied by biogas and ethanolic fermentations and by combustion of the plant material. The fate of HM/R in the different by-products was investigated.

Keywords

Soil Amendment Seepage Water Translocation Factor Indian Mustard Joint Research Project 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Mirgorodsky
    • 1
  • Lukasz Jablonski
    • 2
  • Delphine Ollivier
    • 1
  • Juliane Wittig
    • 2
  • Sabine Willscher
    • 2
  • Dirk Merten
    • 1
  • Georg Büchel
    • 1
  • Peter Werner
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Geological SciencesFriedrich-Schiller-University JenaJenaGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Waste Management and Contaminated Site TreatmentTechnical University DresdenPirnaGermany

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