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Batch Invocation of Web Services in BPEL Process

  • Liang Bao
  • Ping Chen
  • Xiang Zhang
  • Sheng Chen
  • Shengming Hu
  • Yang Yang
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5364)

Abstract

This paper presents our approach for optimizing the execution of BPEL (Business Process Execution Language) process by leveraging the features of enterprise intranet and introduces batBPEL, a tool for batch invocations of web services in BPEL process. The approach focuses on the decrease of connections by forming batch invocation request of web services in BPEL process. Some empirical experiments and evaluations show and prove the efficiency of our method and related algorithms.

Keywords

Business Process Business Process Execution Language Client Agent BPEL Process BPEL Engine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liang Bao
    • 1
  • Ping Chen
    • 1
  • Xiang Zhang
    • 1
  • Sheng Chen
    • 1
  • Shengming Hu
    • 1
  • Yang Yang
    • 1
  1. 1.Software Engineering InstituteXidian UniversityXi’anChina

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