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Shock Waves pp 547-556 | Cite as

Numerical investigation on shock passing through a gas particle suspension and diffracting over a wedge in a duct

  • S. L. Xu
  • S. Han
  • P. T. Yue
  • J. M. Yang
  • R. D. Archer
Conference paper

Abstract

That shock passes through a gas particle suspension called as particle cloud layer, then, diffracts over a wedge were numerically investigated in this paper. The wedge is posed along the lower duct wall. Two-fluid model was used to describe the dilute, two-phase flow. Fully Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations were solved by upwind TVD scheme for gas phase. Eulerian equations were solved by NND scheme for dispersed phase. The phase interaction equations, involving drag force and heat transfer between the gas and particles, were solved by 2nd Runge-Kutta approach. Also, several parameters, i. e. droplet diameter, particle cloud layer position, moving shock Mach number and wedge height, were tested to show their effects to the two-phase flow field. The distributions of contours for gas pressure and density of dispersed phase were obtained at different time intervals. The results show the evolution of the shock and demonstrate the effects of key parameter to the flow field of the two-phase flow. Such a two-phase flow field is much more complicated than that of particle free gas flow.

Keywords

Disperse Phase Cloud Layer Particle Cloud Pressure Contour Mach Reflection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. L. Xu
    • 1
  • S. Han
    • 1
  • P. T. Yue
    • 1
  • J. M. Yang
    • 1
  • R. D. Archer
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Mechanics and Mech. Eng.University of Science and Technology of ChinaHefeiChina
  2. 2.Dept. of Aerospace Eng.University of New South WalesAustralia

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