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Shock Waves pp 781-788 | Cite as

Numerical and experimental study on the effect of obstacles on DDT process

  • A. K. Hayashi
  • H. Shimada
  • K. Eto
  • J. Misawa
  • S. Shiokawa
  • H. Sato
  • N. Tsuboi
  • J. H. S. Lee
Conference paper

Abstract

The present paper deals with the experimental and the numerical findings of break- ing down and re-initiating mechanism of detonation in a tube with obstacles. Experiments are performed for the stoichiometric oxyhydrogen mixture diluted with nitrogen using ICCD cam- eras and pressure transducers. Numerical simulations are also performed for compressible Euler equations to be integrated by a non-MUSCL modified flux type TVD scheme to find out the detailed mechanism of detonation breakdown and its re-initiation. Two types of obstacle arrays are applied to see their effect on detonation propagation and interaction with them; staggered array and symmetry array. The results show that numerical simulation explains a qualitative agreement with the experimental results in pressure profiles and that detonation breaks down at a point between the first obstacle and the second one and re-initiates afterwards. The staggered array gives ignitions behind obstacles and at the interaction between two reflected waves from the first and the second obstacle. On the other hand the symmetry array gives a symmetrical propagation to combustion wave to cause jet ignition. Detonation intensity is stronger when dilution is weaker as known generally.

Keywords

Pressure Profile Combustion Wave Blockage Ratio Compressible Euler Equation Stagger Array 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Tsinghua University Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. K. Hayashi
    • 1
  • H. Shimada
    • 1
  • K. Eto
    • 1
  • J. Misawa
    • 1
  • S. Shiokawa
    • 1
  • H. Sato
    • 1
  • N. Tsuboi
    • 2
  • J. H. S. Lee
    • 3
  1. 1.Aoyama Gakuin UniversityKanagawaJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Space and Astronautical ScienceJapan Aerospace Exploration AgencySagamihara, KanagawaJapan
  3. 3.McGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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