Advertisement

Positioning and Emotions in Tackling Algebra Problems with Technology: The Case of High- and Middle-Achieving Students

  • Wajeeh DaherEmail author
  • Osama Swidan
  • Amani Masarwa
Chapter
Part of the Research in Mathematics Education book series (RME)

Abstract

Interest in affect in mathematical problem-solving is growing using different theoretical frameworks. This chapter utilizes a discursive framework to study students’ emotions in learning to tackle mathematical problems with technology. High- and middle-achieving groups of students worked with technology to tackle problems involving the quadratic function as a product of two linear functions. Doing so, they had similarities as well as differences regarding their positioning and related emotions. These similarities and differences were related to the different aspects of problem-solving expressed in the learning processes performed by the two types of groups in order to achieve their learning goal. Members in the two types of groups claimed the collaborator positioning in order to tackle the mathematical problems using behavioural, social and cognitive processes. Leaders in the high-achieving, as well as in the middle-achieving groups, claimed their positioning through carrying out processes related to the different aspects of problem-solving, mainly the cognitive, metacognitive, meta-emotional, social and linguistic aspects. Moreover, knowledge, being possessed by all the members of the high-achieving groups, resulted in the changing of leaders in these groups. At the same time, knowledge, not being possessed by all the middle-achieving group’s members, resulted in the fixation of leaders in those groups. Furthermore, the members of the middle-achieving groups, due to the lack of appropriate previous knowledge, encountered more difficulties in claiming the positions of leaders and collaborators during the solution process of the mathematical problems than the high-achieving groups. This led to their experiencing more negative emotions than the high-achieving groups.

Keywords

Discursive emotions Positioning Algebra problems Technology High-achieving students Middle-achieving students 

References

  1. Antognazza, D., Di Martino, P., Pellandini, A., & Sbaragli, S. (2015). The flow of emotions in primary school problem solving. In K. Krainer & N. Vondrova (Eds.), Proceedings of the Ninth Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME 9) (pp. 1116–1122). Prague, Czech Republic: European Society for Research in Mathematics Education.Google Scholar
  2. Black, H., Soto, L., & Spurlin, S. (2016). Thinking about thinking about leadership: Metacognitive ability and leader developmental readiness. New Directions for Student Leadership, 2016(149), 85–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brown, L., & Reid, D. (2004). Emotional orientations and somatic markers: Implications for mathematics education. In M. J. Høines & A. B. Fuglestad (Eds.), Proceedings of the twenty-eighth conference of the International Group for the Psychology of mathematics education (Vol. 1, pp. 123–126). Bergen, Norway: PME.Google Scholar
  4. Daher, W. (2011). Learning mathematics in the mobile phone environment: students' emotions. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 22(3), 357–378.Google Scholar
  5. Daher, W., Swidan, O., & Shahbari, J. (2015). Discursive positionings and emotions in a small group’s learning of geometric definitions. In K. Krainer & N. Vondrova (Eds.), Proceedings of the Ninth Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME 9) (pp. 1160–1166). Prague, Czech Republic: European Society for Research in Mathematics Education.Google Scholar
  6. Damasio, A. (1996). Descartes’ error: Emotion, reason and the human brain. New York: Avon Books.Google Scholar
  7. Evans, J. (2006). Affect and emotion in mathematical thinking and learning. In J. Maasz & W. Schloeglmann (Eds.), New mathematics education research and practice (pp. 233–256). Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense Publishers.Google Scholar
  8. Evans, J., Morgan, C., & Tsatsaroni, A. (2006). Discursive positioning and emotion in school mathematics practices. Educational Studies in Mathematics: Affect in Mathematics Education: Exploring Theoretical Frameworks, A PME Special Issue, 63(2), 209–226.Google Scholar
  9. Goldin, G. A. (1988). Affective representation and mathematical problem solving. In M. J. Behr, C. B. Lacampagne, & M. M. Wheeler (Eds.), Proceedings of the 10th annual meeting of PME-NA (pp. 1–7). DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University, Department of Mathematics.Google Scholar
  10. Hannula, M. (2004). Affect in mathematics education – Exploring theoretical frameworks. In M. J. Høines & A. B. Fuglestad (Eds.), Proceedings of the 28th PME International Conference (Vol. 1, pp. 125–154). Bergen, Norway: Bergen University College.Google Scholar
  11. Hannula, M. S. (2015). Emotions in problem solving. In S. J. Cho (Ed.), Selected regular lectures from the 12th international congress on mathematical education (pp. 269–288). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Leithwood, K., Louis, K., Anderson, S., & Wahlstrom, K. (2004). How leadership influences student learning. New York: The Wallace Foundation.Google Scholar
  13. McLeod, D. B. (1988). Affective issues in mathematical problem solving: Some theoretical considerations. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 19, 134–141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Op’t Eynde, P. (2004). A socio-constructivist perspective on the study of affect in mathematics education. In M. Hoines & A. Fuglestad (Eds.), Proceedings of the 28th conference of the International Group for the Psychology of mathematics education (Vol. 1, pp. 118–122). Bergen, Norway: Bergen University College.Google Scholar
  15. Pólya, G. (1957). How to solve it: A new aspect of mathematical method. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Roth, W. M., & Radford, L. (2011). A cultural historical perspective on teaching and learning. Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Salovey, P., & Mayer, J. D. (1990). Emotional intelligence. Imagination, Cognition and Personality, 9, 185–211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Schoenfeld, A. H. (1985). Mathematical problem solving. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  19. Tsatsaroni, A., Evans, J., & Morgan, C. (2007). Pedagogic discourse, positioning and emotion: Illustrations from school mathematics. Review of Science, Mathematics and ICT Education, 1(1), 83–105.Google Scholar
  20. Vroom, V., & Jago, A. (1974). Decision making as a social process. Decision Sciences, 5, 743–755.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Zaccaro, S. J. (2007). Trait-bsed perspectives of leadership. American Psychologist, 62(1), 6–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Al-Qasemi Academic College of EducationBaqa al-GharbiyyeIsrael
  2. 2.An-Najah National UniversityNablusPalestine
  3. 3.Ben-Gurion UniversityBeershebaIsrael

Personalised recommendations