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Case: San Francisco, California, USA

  • Teresa Sprague
  • Kathrin Prenger-Berninghoff
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Climate Resilient Societies book series (PSCRS)

Abstract

The City of San Francisco chapter gives insight into resilience building efforts as one of the 100 Resilient Cities. The chapter provides a brief introduction into the basic geography, location and land use to give the reader general context, and then delves into the many water-related challenges the city faces as it prepares to reach one million residents by 2040. Several key efforts are highlighted within the city’s Resilient San Francisco strategy including retrofitting urban water infrastructure, developing and implementing the Sea Level Rise Action Plan, and improving water resource reliability through an Urban Watershed Management Program. A quick reference table is provided for readers to grasp water-related components of the Resilient San Francisco strategy. Specific attention is given to the Bay Area Resilient by Design Challenges that, similar to the Resilient Coastlines Project in San Diego, focuses on enhancing resilience for coastal communities. This is followed by a key takeaway conclusion.

Keywords

Water supply reliability Resilient San Francisco Coastal community resilience Sea level rise Water reuse Water infrastructure 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Woodard & Curran Inc.San FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Urban and Transport PlanningRWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany

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