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Neuropathology of Spinal Cord Tumors

  • Stephanie LivingstonEmail author
  • Blazej Zbytek
Chapter

Abstract

Herein we present a histological review of spinal cord tumors, including subtypes, grading, morphology, frequency, and biological behavior. The review characterizes the most commonly occurring primary spinal cord neoplasms in detail, including ependymomas, astrocytomas, hemangioblastomas, meningiomas, schwannomas, neurofibromas, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. For completeness, we conclude with comments on spinal metastases and rare spinal cord tumors.

Keywords

Spinal tumor Spinal neoplasm Intramedullary Intradural-Extramedullary Extradural Ependymoma Astrocytoma Hemangioblastoma Meningioma Schwannoma Neurofibroma Myxopapillary Ependymoma Glioma Glioblastoma von Hippel-Lindau MPNST Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors Nerve sheath tumors Neurofibromatosis H3 K27-mutant diffuse midline Glioma Pilocytic astrocytoma 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of Tennessee Health Science CenterMemphisUSA

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