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Introduction to Oceanographic and Biological Aspects of the Red Sea

  • Najeeb M. A. Rasul
  • Ian C. F. Stewart
  • Peter Vine
  • Zohair A. Nawab
Chapter
Part of the Springer Oceanography book series (SPRINGEROCEAN)

Location, Bathymetry and Statistics

This volume builds on the success of a previous publication, “The Red Sea: The Formation, Morphology, Oceanography and Environment of a Young Ocean Basin”, edited by Rasul and Stewart (2015), in which an extensive introduction (Rasul et al. 2015) outlined the main features of the Red Sea, including aspects of the oceanography and biology which will not be repeated here in detail.

The Red Sea is a semi-enclosed, elongated body of relatively warm water, about 2000 km long with a maximum width of 355 km, a surface area of roughly 458,620 km 2, and a volume of ~250,000 km 3 (Head 1987). The Red Sea is bounded by nine countries, with numerous coastal lagoons, a large number of islands of various dimensions and extensive groups of shoals; it is bifurcated by the Sinai Peninsula into the Gulf of Aqaba and the Gulf of Suez at its northern end (Fig.  1.1). The sea is connected to the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean via the Gulf of Aden in the south through the...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Najeeb M. A. Rasul
    • 1
  • Ian C. F. Stewart
    • 2
  • Peter Vine
    • 3
  • Zohair A. Nawab
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Marine Geology, Saudi Geological SurveyJeddahSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.Stewart Geophysical Consultants Pty. Ltd.AdelaideAustralia
  3. 3.Earth and Ocean Sciences, School of Natural SciencesNUI GalwayGalwayIreland
  4. 4.Saudi Geological SurveyJeddahSaudi Arabia

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