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Atmospheric Electrical Conductivity Measurements During Monsoon Period at a Semi-Urban Tropical Station of Northern India

  • Adarsh Kumar
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Environmental Science book series (BRIEFSENVIRONMENTAL)

Abstract

Measurements of atmospheric electrical conductivity during monsoon period at a semi-urban tropical region of Northern India were carried out and presented in this chapter. The continuous measurements of atmospheric electrical positive conductivity along with some meteorological parameters was made with the help of atmospheric conductivity meter during the monsoon season (June to August, 2010) at Roorkee (29°52′ N, 77°53′ E, 275 m above sea level). The electrical conductivity for the 3 consecutive months was in the range of 26–20, 66–17, and 55–28 × 10−16 S/m respectively. The atmospheric electrical conductivity was positively correlated with wind speed, relative humidity, and rainfall, while it was found to be negatively correlated with average temperature in the monsoon period. Explanations for the variation of atmospheric electrical conductivity in the light of meteorological parameters were also discussed.

Keywords

Electrical conductivity Climate change Monsoon Wind speed Air temperature 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The corresponding author is grateful to Prof. A.L. Verma, Advisor (Science & Technology-Research), Amity University, Noida, India for providing motivation and necessary computational facilities towards this work. Special thanks are also highly due to Prof. J. Rai, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India for engaging in fruitful discussions towards completing the present work.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Physics, Amity Institute of Applied Sciences (AIAS)Amity UniversityNoidaIndia

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