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Making Mathematical Connections Between Abstract Algebra and Secondary Mathematics Explicit: Implications for Curriculum, Research, and Faculty Professional Development

  • James A. Mendoza ÁlvarezEmail author
  • Diana White
Chapter
Part of the Research in Mathematics Education book series (RME)

Abstract

This commentary chapter examines the four chapters in this section, which focus on connecting abstract algebra to secondary mathematics, from both practitioner and research-based viewpoints of their interrelated themes and implications for curriculum, research, and faculty professional development. In the context of making mathematical connections between abstract algebra and secondary mathematics explicit, this commentary reflects on the learning goals for preservice secondary mathematics teachers (PSMTs), curricular goals for PSMTs, and the implications of these efforts that include calls both for further research and for addressing the professional development needs of faculty.

Keywords

Mathematical knowledge for teaching Preservice secondary mathematics teacher preparation Abstract algebra for teachers 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of MathematicsThe University of Texas at ArlingtonArlingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mathematical and Statistical SciencesUniversity of Colorado Denver DenverUSA

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