Advertisement

Husserl at Harvard: The Origins of American Phenomenology

  • Jonathan Strassfeld
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Phenomenology book series (CTPH, volume 100)

Abstract

“Husserl at Harvard: The Origins of American Phenomenology” examines the first interactions between American philosophers and Edmund Husserl, describing a pattern of serious and sustained interest in the phenomenological movement centered at Harvard University during the first three decades of the twentieth century. Beginning in 1902 with W.E. Hocking, at least seven Harvard students had studied with Husserl by 1925. By examining these transatlantic exchanges systematically, this essay argues that Husserlian philosophy enjoyed a promising initial reception in the United States and shows why Harvard was particularly fertile ground for Husserl’s thought.

Keywords

Harvard American Philosophy William Ernest Hocking Winthrop Pickard Bell Marvin Farber Dorion Cairns 

References

  1. Allen, Ruth, and W.E. Hocking. 1938. Box 11, Folder Harvard Uniersity Department of Philosophy (3 of 10), William Ernest Hocking Corresponence. Cambridge, MA: Houghton Library.Google Scholar
  2. Baylis, Charles, and Dean C.H. Moore. 1927. Box 15, Folder Sheldon Fellows 1926–1927, Records from the Committee on General Scholarships and the Sheldon Fund, 1903–1969. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  3. Bell, Winthrop Pickard, and Ralph Barton Perry. 1914. Box 2, Folder 116, Graduate Student Folders, Pre-1917. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  4. Bell, Winthrop Pickard, and Herbert Spiegelberg. 1955. Box 8550/1/101, Winthrop Pickard Bell fonds. Sackville: Mount Allison University Archives.Google Scholar
  5. Biography of Dr. Winthrop Pickard Bell. http://www.mta.ca/wpbell/bio.htm.
  6. Brown, William Adams, and R.B. Perry. 1921. Box 4, Folder A-B, Ralph Barton Perry Correspondence. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  7. Cairns, Dorion. My Own Life. http://www.dorioncairns.net/mylife.htm.
  8. Cairns, Dorion, and Ralph Barton Perry. 1932. Box 4, Folder C-F, Ralph Barton Perry Correspondence. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  9. Chandler, Albert Richard. 1913. Plato’s Theory of Ideas Studied in the Light of Husserl’s Theory of Universals. PhD dissertation, Harvard University.Google Scholar
  10. Chandler, Albert R. 1917. Professor Husserl’s Program of Philosophic Reform. The Philosophical Review 26 (6): 634–648.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Cho, Kah Kyung, and Lynn E. Rose. 1981. Obituary: Marvin Farber (1901–1980). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (1): 1–4.Google Scholar
  12. Embree, Lester. 1989. The Legacy of Dorion Cairns and Aron Gurwitsch. In American Phenomenology: Origins and Developments, Analecta Husserliana, ed. Eugene Francis Kaelin and Calvin O. Schrag, vol. xxxi, 445 p. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  13. ———. 2013. Editorial Forward. In The Philosophy of Edmund Husserl, by Dorion Cairns, ed. Lester Embree, vol. xviii, 308 pages. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  14. Ewald, Oscar. 1907. Contemporary Philosophy in Germany (1906). The Philosophical Review 16 (3): 237–265.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. ———. 1908. German Philosophy in 1907. The Philosophical Review 17 (4): 400–426.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. ———. 1909. German Philosophy in 1908. The Philosophical Review 18 (5): 514–535.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. ———. 1914. German Philosophy in 1913. The Philosophical Review 23 (6): 615–633.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Farber, Marvin. 1924. The Perceptual Object. In Marvin Farber Papers. Cambridge, MA: University Archives/The State University of New York at Buffalo.Google Scholar
  19. ———. 1928. Phenomenology as a Method and as a Philosophical Discipline. Buffalo: University of Buffalo.Google Scholar
  20. Farber, Marvin “Phenomenology the Last Stronghold of Idealism,” Box 30, Folder 15, Marvin Farber Papers, University Archives: The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo.Google Scholar
  21. Farber, Marvin, and W.E. Hocking. 1923. Box 8, Folder 19, Marvin Farber Papers. Buffalo: University Archives: The State University of New York at Buffalo.Google Scholar
  22. Frankena, William, and R.B. Perry. 1936. Box 8, Folder 4, Ralph Barton Perry Corresondence. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  23. Gura, Philip F. 2007. American Transcendentalism: A History. 1st ed. New York: Hill and Wang.Google Scholar
  24. Hartshorne, Charles, and L.B.R. Briggs. 1924. Box 12, Folder Sheldon Fellows 1923–1924. Cambridge, MA: Records from the Committee on General Scholarships and the Sheldon Fund, Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  25. Harvard University. 1910. Reports of the President of and Treasurer Harvard College 1908–09. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  26. ———. 1913. Reports of the President of and Treasurer Harvard College 1911–12. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  27. ———. 1920. The Harvard University Catalogue: 1920–1921. Cambridge: Published for the University by C.W. Sever.Google Scholar
  28. ———. 1922. Official Register of Harvard University: Announcement of the Courses of Instruction Offered by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences 1922–23. Vol. XIX, no. 45.Google Scholar
  29. Hocking, W.E., and Edmund Husserl. 1924. Box 12, Folder Edmund Husserl (4 of 4) William Ernest Hocking correspondence, 1860–1979. Cambridge, MA: Houghton Library.Google Scholar
  30. ———. 1932. Box 12, Folder Edmund Husserl (4 of 4), William Ernest Hocking Correspondence. Cambridge, MA: Houghton Library.Google Scholar
  31. Hocking, W.E., and Hugo Münsterberg. 1902. Box 18, Folder Hugo Münsterberg (1 of 2), William Ernest Hocking Correspondence. Cambridge, MA: Houghton Library.Google Scholar
  32. ———. 1908. Review of Zur Einteilung der Wissenschaften, C. Stumpf. The Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 5 (10): 271–275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. ———. 1928. What Does Philosophy Say? The Philosophical Review 37 (2): 133–155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Hocking, W.E. 1959. From the Early Days of the ‘Logische Untersuchungen’. In Edmund Husserl, 1859–1959, ed. The editorial committee of Phaenomenologica, 306 p. La Haye: M. Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  35. Holt, Edwin B., Walter T. Marvin, W.P. Montague, Ralph Barton Perry, Walter B. Pitkin, and Edward Gleason Spaulding. 1910. The Program and First Platform of Six Realists. The Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 7 (15): 393–401.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Husserl, Edmund. 1970. Logical Investigations. Trans. J.N. Findlay. International Library of Philosophy and Scientific Method. 2 vols. New York: Humanities Press.Google Scholar
  37. Husserl, Edmund, and W.E. Hocking. 1932. Box 12, Folder Edmund Husserl (4 of 4), William Ernest Hocking Correspondence. Cambridge, MA: Houghton Library.Google Scholar
  38. James, William, Ignas K. Skrupskelis, Elizabeth M. Berkeley, and Henry James. 1992. The Correspondence of William James. 12 vols. Vol. 10. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia.Google Scholar
  39. Kuklick, Bruce. 1977. The Rise of American Philosophy, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1860–1930. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  40. ———. 1985. Churchmen and Philosophers: From Jonathan Edwards to John Dewey. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  41. ———. 2001. A History of Philosophy in America, 1720–2000. New York: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  42. Lovejoy, Arthur O. 1917. On Some Conditions of Progress in Philosophical Inquiry. The Philosophical Review 26 (2): 123–163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. McGill, Vivian Jerould, and Sheldon Fellowship Committee. 1925. Box 14, Folder Sheldon Fellows, Records from the Committee on General Scholarships and the Sheldon Fund. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  44. Murray, E. 1907. Summaries of Articles: “Psychologische Prinzipienfragen,” by H. Cornelius. The Philosophical Review 16 (1): 101–112.Google Scholar
  45. Nelson, Everett John, and The Chairman of the Committee on the Sheldon Fund. 1930. Box 17, Folder Sheldon Fellows 1929–1930. Cambridge, MA: Records from the Committee on General Scholarships and the Sheldon Fund, Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  46. Palmer, G.H., and R.B. Perry. 1930. Philosophy, 1870–1929. In The Development of Harvard University since the Inauguration of President Eliot, 1869–1929, xc, 660 p., 84 p. of plates (2 folded). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  47. Parry, William T. 1977. V. Jerauld Mcgill (1897–1977). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (2): 283–286.Google Scholar
  48. Perry, Ralph Barton, and Winthrop Pickard Bell. 1914. Dept. of Philosophy & Dept. of Philosophy and Psychology: Outgoing Correspondence, 1910–1915. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  49. ———. 1914b. Dept. of Philosophy & Dept. of Philosophy and Psychology: Outgoing Correspondence, 1910–1915. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  50. Perry, Ralph Barton, and M.M. Bober. 1926. Philosophy of the Recent Past. New York: C. Scribner’s sons.Google Scholar
  51. ———. 1930. Box 7, Folder B, Ralph Barton Perry Correspondence. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  52. Perry, Ralph Barton, and Dean C.H. Haskins. 1914. Dept. of Philosophy & Dept. of Philosophy and Psychology: Outgoing Correspondence, 1910–1915. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  53. Perry, Ralph Barton, and Abbott Lawrence Lowell. 1914. Dept. of Philosophy & Dept. of Philosophy and Psychology: Outgoing Correspondence, 1910–1915. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  54. Phillips, William, and Frank W. Hunnewell. 1914. Box 2, Folder 116, Graduate Student Folders, Pre-1917. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  55. Pitkin, Walter B. 1905. The Psychology of ‘Eternal Truths’. The Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (17): 449–455.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. ———. 1912. Is Agreement Desirable. The Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 9 (26): 711–715.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. ———. 1913. Time and the Percept. The Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 10 (12): 309–319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. ———. 1944. On My Own. New York: C. Scribner’s sons.Google Scholar
  59. Schuhmann, Karl. 1977. Husserl-Chronik: Denk- Und Lebensweg Edmund Husserls. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Spiegelberg, Herbert. 1965a. The Phenomenological Movement; a Historical Introduction, Phaenomenologica. Vol. 1. 2nd ed. Den Haag: M. Nijhoff.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. ———. 1965b. The Phenomenological Movement; a Historical Introduction, Phaenomenologica. Vol. 2. 2nd ed. Den Haag: M. Nijhoff.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. ———. 1981. The Context of the Phenomenological Movement. Den Haag: Martinus Nijhoff.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Tuttle, J.R. 1911. Summaries of Articles: “Philosophie Als Strenge Wissenschaft,” by Edmund Husserl. The Philosophical Review 20 (5): 573–585.Google Scholar
  64. Underhill, Robert Lindley Murray, and R.B. Perry. 1915. Box 3, Folder 3, Ralph Barton Perry Correspondence. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  65. Veysey, Laurence R. 1965. The Emergence of the American University. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  66. Volume Information. 1940. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 1, no. 1.Google Scholar
  67. Weiss, Paul, and James Woods. 1929. Box 9, Folder Weiss, Prof. Paul 1935–6, Harvard Philosophy Department Papers: Dept. of Philosophy and Psychology; the Dept. of Psychology; and the Division of Philosophy and Psychology: Correspondence and Other Records, ca.1927–1938. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archive.Google Scholar
  68. Wild, John, and R.B. Perry. 1931. Box 5, Folder W-Z, Ralph Barton Perry Correspondence. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar
  69. Willard, Dallas. 1995. Knowledge. In The Cambridge Companion to Husserl, ed. Barry Smith and David Woodruff Smith, vol. viii, 518 p. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  70. Woods, James, and C.H. Moore. 1926. Box 15, Folder Sheldon Fellowships 1926–1927. Cambridge, MA: Records from the Committee on General Scholarships and the Sheldon Fund, Harvard University Archives.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Strassfeld
    • 1
  1. 1.University of RochesterRochesterUSA

Personalised recommendations