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Shifting Rationalities and Multiple Democracies: The New Meanings of Neoliberal Democracy

  • Kendall A. Taylor
Chapter
Part of the New Frontiers in Education, Culture, and Politics book series (NFECP)

Abstract

This Chapter argues that neoliberal governance rationalities have operated to redirect the focus of democracy on the institutional inputs rather than the outcomes of democratic practices as experienced by citizens. This focus has served to leverage an inherent contradiction within democracy as it has historically been understood, bringing to the fore technocratic understandings which both individualizes instances in which democratic practices are called for and dislocates these processes from their outcomes. The school closing policy in Chicago is examined to explore how differing understandings of democracy and freedom (negative, positive, and accountable) have stood in contrast to one another and to highlight the ways in which democratic processes have been subsumed under the current neoliberal rationality.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kendall A. Taylor
    • 1
  1. 1.Hubert Humphrey Elementary SchoolAlbuquerqueUSA

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