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Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis

  • Mona Hassan
  • Dilip MoonkaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a common and potentially fatal infection of ascitic fluid in patients with cirrhosis. It is distinguished from secondary peritonitis by the absence of an evident intra-abdominal surgically treatable source. The prevalence of SBP is 10–30% in hospitalized patients with cirrhosis and ascites. Patients may present with symptoms such as abdominal pain, altered mental status, or fevers and chills. However, patients are often asymptomatic. In this chapter, we describe a case of SBP and discuss pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment options, and outcomes.

Keywords

Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) Ascites Decompensated cirrhosis Non-neutrocytic bacterascites Culture-negative neutrocytic ascites 

Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Gastroenterology and Liver DiseaseHenry Ford HospitalDetroitUSA
  2. 2.Medical Director of Liver Transplantation, Division of Gastroenterology and Liver DiseaseHenry Ford HospitalDetroitUSA

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