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Management of Esophageal Motility Disorders

  • Anthony R. Tascone
  • Caitlin A. HalbertEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders can be difficult and complex. Patients generally present with dysphagia and chest pain and may have associated gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Imaging and endoscopy are the first steps in determining the accurate diagnosis and help to rule out other etiologies, such as esophageal cancer. The esophageal motility disorder is defined by the findings on high-resolution manometry. Recent changes to the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility disorders highlight new terminology, which includes distal esophageal spasm, absent esophageal contractility, and jackhammer esophagus. Treatment is then tailored for the specific classification. Achalasia, which falls under the category of esophageal motility disorders, will be discussed in a separate chapter.

Keywords

Esophageal motility disorder Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) Distal esophageal spasm Diffuse esophageal spasm Absent esophageal contractility Jackhammer esophagus 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of General SurgerySaint Luke’s Health SystemKansas CityUSA
  2. 2.Advanced GI and Bariatric Surgery, Department of General SurgeryChristiana Care Health SystemNewarkUSA

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