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Omphalocele and Gastroschisis

  • Jonathan H. DeAntonio
  • Dan W. Parrish
  • David A. LanningEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Omphaloceles are midline abdominal wall defects with a peritoneal membrane covering the abdominal contents. Gastroschisis occurs usually to the right of the umbilical cord, with eviscerated abdominal contents that are not surrounded by a peritoneal covering. Omphaloceles are associated with numerous congenital anomalies. Both are typically diagnosed on prenatal ultrasound. Gastroschisis and omphalocele defects are covered with saline moistened gauze, and infants with gastroschisis are placed inside a plastic bag-like device. Surgical management of gastroschisis typically consists of placing abdominal contents into the abdominal cavity and repairing the defect primarily or covering to allow closure by second intention healing. If the bowel is too distended, it can be placed within a silo and slowly reduced back into the abdomen prior to closure. Omphalocele repair is more complex and varies by size and associated congenital malformations. The repairs can be described as immediate (small to medium), staged (medium to large), or delayed (giant).

Keywords

Omphalocele Gastroschisis Ischemic bowel Perforation Congenital anomalies/defects Silo Giant omphalocele 

References

  1. 1.
    Islam S. Abdominal wall defects: omphalocele and gastroschisis. In: Ziegler MM, Azizkhan RG, Dv A, Weber TR, editors. Operative pediatric surgery. New York: McGraw-Hill Education; 2014.Google Scholar
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    Allman R, Sousa J, Walker MW, Laughon MM, Spitzer AR, Clark RH. The epidemiology, prevalence and hospital outcomes of infants with gastroschisis. J Perinatol. 2016;36(10):901–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan H. DeAntonio
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dan W. Parrish
    • 3
  • David A. Lanning
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of General SurgeryVirginia Commonwealth University HealthRichmondUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryVirginia Commonwealth University School of MedicineRichmondUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pediatric Surgery, Batson Children’s HospitalUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterJacksonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Surgery and PediatricsChildren’s Hospital of RichmondRichmondUSA

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