Advertisement

Hypothyroidism

  • Lukasz CzerwonkaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Hypothyroidism is very common primarily due to Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Management is usually straightforward with thyroid hormone replacement in symptomatic patients, although patients without symptoms but with significantly elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) may also benefit from treatment. Central hypothyroidism is rare and requires evaluation for a sellar mass.

Keywords

Hashimoto’s Sellar mass Thyroid peroxidase Levothyroxine Weight gain Cold intolerance 

References

  1. 1.
    Sweeney LB, Stewart C, Gaitonde DY. Thyroiditis: an integrated approach. Am Fam Physician. 2014;90(6):389–96.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Jonklaas J, Bianco AC, Bauer AJ, Burman KD, Cappola AR, Celi FS, et al. Guidelines for the treatment of hypothyroidism: prepared by the American Thyroid Association task force on thyroid hormone replacement. Thyroid. 2014;24(12):1670–751.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hollowell JG, Staehling NW, Flanders WD, Hannon WH, Gunter EW, Spencer CA, et al. Serum TSH, T4, and thyroid antibodies in the United States population (1988 to 1994): National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). J Clin Endocrinol Metabol. 2002;87(2):489–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Vanderpump MP, Tunbridge WM, French JM, Appleton D, Bates D, Clark F, Grimley Evans J, Hasan DM, Rodgers H, Tunbridge F, et al. The incidence of thyroid disorders in the community: a twenty-year follow-up of the Whickham Survey. Clin Endocrinol. 1995;43(1):55–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Rodondi N, Den Elzen WP, Bauer DC, Cappola AR, Razvi S, Walsh JP, et al. Subclinical hypothyroidism and the risk of coronary heart disease and mortality. JAMA. 2010;304(12):1365–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Persani L. Central hypothyroidism: pathogenic, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges. J Clin Endocrinol Metabol. 2012 Sep;97(9):3068–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck SurgeryStony Brook University HospitalStony BrookUSA

Personalised recommendations