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Ultrasound in Global Health Radiology

  • Carrie HayesEmail author
  • Christina Hendricks
  • Diana Mishler
  • Matthew Schwartz
  • Nancy Barge
Chapter

Abstract

Global health seeks to address healthcare disparities, and sonography has an important part to play in achieving global health targets. Ultrasound is a beneficial and critical imaging modality because of its affordability and effectiveness in the imaging of noncommunicable and infectious diseases. Ultrasound can be successfully integrated into global health partnerships but must be thoughtfully supported by assessment, training, and human capacity development.

Keywords

Ultrasound Sonographers Global Education Infection control Volunteers Radiology Sonography Outreach Images 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carrie Hayes
    • 1
    Email author
  • Christina Hendricks
    • 1
  • Diana Mishler
    • 1
  • Matthew Schwartz
    • 1
  • Nancy Barge
    • 1
  1. 1.RAD-AID International, Ultrasound ProgramChevy ChaseUSA

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