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What Clinicians Should Consider When Evaluating the Cancer Patient with Abdominal Pain?

  • Karin ChaseEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Abdominal pain in the patient with malignancy can range from common benign etiologies to life- threatening complications of their underlying disease. Emergency providers (EP) must perform a detailed history and physical exam while thoroughly exploring past and current treatments for malignancy in order to generate a comprehensive differential diagnosis. This chapter will focus on etiologies that are directly related to the malignancy and those secondary to treatment of the malignancy.

Keywords

Malignant bowel obstruction Malignant ascites Budd-Chiari syndrome Radiation enteritis Neutropenic enterocolitis Abdominal cancer emergencies 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA

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