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The Road to Professor in Leiden

  • Jan Guichelaar
Chapter
Part of the Springer Biographies book series (SPRINGERBIOGS)

Abstract

Kapteyn was born in the village of Barneveld in the province of Gelderland, where his parents had a boarding school, where French was the official language. Kapteyn’s father came from a true teachers’ family. The busy parents had not much attention for their own children. Kapteyn, ninth child of fifteen, suffered from this lack of attention. He made his first astronomical observations with a telescope, a present from his father. He was very talented and went to Utrecht in order to study mathematics and physics in 1868, where he took his doctoral degree magna cum laude with his advisor Cornelius H. C. Grinwis (1831–1899) in 1875.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AmsterdamThe Netherlands

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