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US Development Policy in the Ongoing War on Terror

  • Eamonn McConnon
Chapter
Part of the Rethinking International Development series book series (RID)

Abstract

This chapter examines the merging of the security and development policy of the US through an analysis of policy documents, aid figures and interviews. It argues that the US has sought greater coordination between its military, foreign policy and development wings of government. This has heightened in the post-9/11 period and has resulted in a closer relationship between USAID, the DoD and the DoS in national security policy. Within this, development aid is expected to contribute to US national security by addressing the root causes of security risks, and development policy is supposed to inform security policy. This chapter shows that, in practice, dominant voices within the DoD and other security agencies within the US government set the agenda for security and development, which USAID has to follow.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eamonn McConnon
    • 1
  1. 1.The School of Law and GovernmentDublin City UniversityDublinIreland

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