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Additional Substances to Glaucoma Medication: Preservative Free Treatment

  • Giedre Pakuliene
Chapter

Abstract

Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is one of the most popular preservatives, used in antiglaucomatous drugs. BAK mechanism of action is based on its’ ability to interfere with microorganisms’ cell membranes, causing lipid dispersion and lysis [1]. BAK is highly lipophilic and acts as a detergent on the tear film. [2] Corneal cell membranes are also composed of phospholipid bilayer, which is susceptible to BAK [3].

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giedre Pakuliene
    • 1
  1. 1.Lithuanian University of Health ScienceKaunasLithuania

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