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Extending Wireless Powered Communication Networks for Future Internet of Things

  • Abbas Jamalipour
  • Ying Bi
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, we propose a DH-WPCN with one HAP and a number of relays and users. Assuming that the users have fixed energy supplies and the relays need to harvest energy from RF transmission of the HAP, we presented uplink and downlink communication protocols. Optimal values of parameters for maximizing the total throughput of the network in both directions were found. Specifically, we formulated uplink and downlink sum-throughput maximization problems to find optimal time allocation in both uplink and downlink communications as well as optimal power splitting factors in downlink communication. The convex structure of the uplink throughput maximization problem allowed us to obtain the optimal value of the time-slot durations for energy and information transfer in closed form, while in downlink throughput maximization, we used iterations for finding a near-optimal solution due to the non-convexity of the problem. We evaluated the uplink and downlink throughput performance of our proposed schemes via simulations and identified the existence of the doubly near-far problem in uplink communication which results in extremely unfair throughput distribution among the users. Due to the dependence of each user’s achievable throughput on its corresponding relay’s distance from the HAP, we proposed to dynamically adjust the location of the relays to attain a more balanced throughput allocation in the network. Numerical results confirmed that the position of the relays has a major impact on users’ throughputs and the severity of the throughput unfairness can be controlled by changing relays’ placements. Next in Sect. 3.2, we investigate a more robust solution for tackling the aforementioned fairness issue and developed a fairness enhancement scheme to provide all users with equal throughput. We formulated a minimum throughput maximization problem and proposed a novel algorithm for finding the maximum common throughput of the users plus the optimal time allocation for achieving the maximum level of fairness. We also conducted simulations to compare the performance of the proposed fairness-improving scheme with the strategy presented in Sect. 3.1. Simulation results revealed a throughput-fairness trade-off in our DH-WPCN implying that the fairness is achieved at the cost of total throughput reduction. Therefore, depending on the network requirements in terms of sum-throughput and fairness, either the strategy proposed in Sect. 3.1 or the scheme presented in Sect. 3.2 can be chosen as the optimal policy.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abbas Jamalipour
    • 1
  • Ying Bi
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of SydneySydneyAustralia

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