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Policy Studies and Regional Public Policy-Making

  • Anne Marie Hoffmann
Chapter
Part of the Governance, Development, and Social Inclusion in Latin America book series (GDSILA)

Abstract

The objective of this chapter is to develop a model for the analysis of regional public policy-making. This model connects the macro-level, which is determined by the structures and the normativity of the respective region, with the micro-level of policy-making, represented by transgovernmental networks. Concepts of policy studies complement regional integration theory and will be used to identify factors that influence these networks. Policy studies traditionally consider the national sphere of public policy-making. Also, approaches for policy-making at the global level have increasingly been developed. Until now, however, a regional level of public policy-making has not yet been theorized. This chapter, therefore, relies on findings of both levels: the national and the global. The analytical dimensions of actors, interests, structures, and ideas are discussed individually in view of the regional level of policy-making. Finally, the analytical model is designed based on the findings for these dimensions.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne Marie Hoffmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Hamburg University of Applied SciencesHamburgGermany

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