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Public Policies in Regional Integration Theory

  • Anne Marie Hoffmann
Chapter
Part of the Governance, Development, and Social Inclusion in Latin America book series (GDSILA)

Abstract

The literature on regional integration has been dominated by the quest for explanations as to why supranationality is failing. The empirical phenomena of today, however, require new theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of regions. Regional integration studies, accordingly, are experiencing major revisions and are receiving a variety of inputs. Nevertheless, the dimension of public policies did not enter academic debates yet. This chapter reviews traditional regional integration theory as well as new literature on regionalism in light of insights, which are useful for the analysis of regional public policy-making. It summarizes the existing literature of regional integration studies, derives relevant assumptions, and categorizes them into analytical dimensions. These categories will inform the conceptualization of regional public policy-making.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne Marie Hoffmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Hamburg University of Applied SciencesHamburgGermany

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