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Recreational Climbing and Scrambling

  • David Huddart
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, the types of climbing are defined and numbers involved are estimated. The effects of traditional summer climbing on cliff vegetation and other biota, like gastropods, are evaluated. This includes “gardening,” footpath erosion up to the crags, at the tops, and a decrease in rare and endangered species and tree damage from abseiling and belaying. The effects of cliff micro-topography and climbers’ preferences are discussed with regard to the vegetation distribution and the fact that not all effects are negative. The impacts on bird populations are evaluated, and the damage to the rock by ropes, chalk, protection, and the creation of rock polish is discussed. Other environmental effects from bouldering, winter, and mixed climbing are evaluated. The management to counteract these impacts such as management plans, memorandums of understanding, liaison groups, closures, seasonal restrictions, star systems in guides, permits, and outreach and education, including codes of conduct, are discussed and evaluated.

Keywords

Climbing impacts on vegetation and gastropods Cliff micro-topography Climbing effects on bird populations Rock damage by ropes, protection, rock polish Management of climbing: plans, memorandums of understanding, closures, seasonal restrictions Outreach and education 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Huddart
    • 1
  1. 1.Liverpool John Moores UniversityLiverpoolUK

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