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Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for Children with Developmental Delay and Related Problems

  • Dainelys Garcia
  • Loreen Magariño
  • Daniel M. Bagner
Chapter

Abstract

Young children with or at risk for developmental delay have been shown to be at significantly higher risk for behavior problems and other associated problems, including academic problems, peer problems, and parental stress. In recent years, intervention efforts targeting behavior problems have grown exponentially. Parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT) is an early behavioral parenting training intervention that has received increased research and clinical attention as studies have expanded to include children with developmental delay and related problems. In this chapter, we provide an overview of research studies over the past decade examining PCIT for children with developmental delay and related problems, such as intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, and conditions that increase risk for disability, such as premature birth and traumatic brain injury. Lastly, we provide a case example using PCIT for a 5-year-old African American female with elevated behavior problems following a moderate traumatic brain injury, and conclude with a summary of future directions for PCIT for children with or at risk for developmental delay.

Keywords

Developmental delay Intellectual disability Autism spectrum disorder Premature birth Traumatic brain injury Parent–child interaction therapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dainelys Garcia
    • 1
  • Loreen Magariño
    • 2
  • Daniel M. Bagner
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Miller School of MedicineUniversity of MiamiMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology, Center for Children and FamiliesFlorida International UniversityMiamiUSA

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