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Effect of Water on Cooling Efficiency of Activated Carbon Based Thermal Cooling Layer Beneath the Solar Cell to Boost Their Working Efficiency

  • Vivek Kumar
  • Amit Kumar
  • Hrishikesh Dhasmana
  • Abhishek VermaEmail author
  • V. K. Jain
Conference paper
Part of the Springer Proceedings in Physics book series (SPPHY, volume 215)

Abstract

Activated carbon based highly porous thermal cooling layer (TCL) is used as heat dissipating material beneath the solar cell to decrease the working temperature of the device. Thickness dependent cooling efficiency of the TCL layer have been analyzed in detail. In our experiments, the maximum working temperature of our studied solar cell reaches to 88 °C under constant illumination condition of 1450 W/m2. Upon using our TCL beneath the cell, this saturation temperature reaches to 74.2 °C, thereby increase the absolute working efficiency ~1% in comparison to the cell without TCL. Further, the effect of water, as coolant, on the cooling efficiency of the TCL has also been studied in detail. We have attained the maximum saturation temperature of around 58 °C by purging only 10 mL water in our optimized TCL. TCL remains at 58 °C for around 3 h. by purging 10 mL water and our device works with around 1.63% higher efficiency in comparison to the standard device without TCL.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are thankful to Dr. Ashok K. Chauhan, Founder President, Amity University, Noida for his continuous guidance and encouragement. The authors also gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Department of Science and Technology (DST), Govt. of India, Project No. DST/TM/SERI/FR/208(G).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vivek Kumar
    • 1
  • Amit Kumar
    • 1
  • Hrishikesh Dhasmana
    • 1
  • Abhishek Verma
    • 1
    Email author
  • V. K. Jain
    • 1
  1. 1.Amity Institute for Advanced Research and Studies (Materials and Devices) and Amity Institute of Renewable and Alternative EnergyAmity UniversityNoidaIndia

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