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Food Safety: Building EU Regulatory Capacity Through the Backdoor

  • Eva Heims
Chapter
Part of the Executive Politics and Governance book series (EXPOLGOV)

Abstract

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is responsible for scientific risk assessments. Contrary to other EU agencies, however, its scientific panels are comprised of ‘independent’ experts rather than national agency officials. The Food and Veterinary Office (FVO), on the other hand, inspects national food inspection agencies to close regulatory loopholes emerging from diverging practices. Although we may not expect great enthusiasm for EU food regulators on part of national authorities in this context, German and UK authorities actively support EFSA in its work and welcome FVO’s inspection. Food risk assessors do so because it helps them to tackle the challenge of maintaining public trust in their work. However, they are sceptical about the formally unrecognised contribution they make to EU regulatory capacity building. In food controls, UK and German authorities value FVO inspections as a means to coax their local inspection authorities into uniform inspection practices.

Keywords

Food safety EFSA Risk assessment FVO Food controls 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva Heims
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PoliticsUniversity of YorkYorkUK

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