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Regulatory Capacity Building

  • Eva Heims
Chapter
Part of the Executive Politics and Governance book series (EXPOLGOV)

Abstract

The chapter discusses European Union (EU) regulatory capacity building in the context of a mismatch between rule-making authority and administrative capacity at the EU-level. EU agencies, created to tackle this mismatch, are in fact symptomatic of the EU’s capacity gap: they have key regulatory responsibilities, but have miniscule resources. They are nevertheless able to fulfil their tasks because staff from national authorities proactively support them in their work, for example by supplying their staff to sit on the scientific panels and working groups of EU agencies. From a bureaucratic politics angle, this is surprising, given that we would expect any regulator to guard its turf, rather than to provide ‘life support’ to agencies that could possibly replace them. The chapter thus argues that the crux to understanding how EU regulatory capacity is built is to address the question why national regulators proactively support EU agencies in their work.

Keywords

Regulatory capacity EU agencies EU’s capacity gap National regulators 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eva Heims
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PoliticsUniversity of YorkYorkUK

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