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Introduction

Chapter

Abstract

This thesis deals with the issue of secession in an innovative manner: unlike the conventional approach which invariably focuses on whether there is a right to secession, discussion in this thesis centers on how secessionist conflicts can be effectively settled. For this sake, a multi-dimensional perspective is adopted here: in addition to exploring the legal color of secession, secession is further considered in the context of self-determination conflicts and analyzed in combination with the use of force and other forms of external involvement. The inherent complexity of a secessionist conflict necessitates adopting such a multi-dimensional perspective.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing Lu
    • 1
  1. 1.School of LawSun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouChina

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