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Collective and Cultural Memory: Ethics, Politics, and Avoidance in Remembering Communism

  • Cristian Tileagă
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Discursive Psychology book series (PSDP)

Abstract

This is a chapter that deals with what Kansteiner has called ‘rules of engagement in the competitive arena of memory politics’ (2002, p. 179). These rules of engagement refer primarily to the distinction between collective and cultural memory and to other, selected aspects that pertain to what is usually described as politics of memory (Stan 2013) or the politics of the past (Koposov 2018).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cristian Tileagă
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social SciencesLoughborough UniversityLoughboroughUK

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