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Transitional Justice as Situated Practices

  • Cristian Tileagă
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Discursive Psychology book series (PSDP)

Abstract

Since Ruti Teitel published her influential book in 2000, transitional justice has become established as a flourishing field of research and societal impact. After the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, the social and political experience of post-communist countries with transitional justice has provided a natural laboratory for exploring a wide range of practices, programs, and methods of coming to terms with the communist past.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cristian Tileagă
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social SciencesLoughborough UniversityLoughboroughUK

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