Advertisement

Introduction: what does coming to terms with the past mean?

  • Cristian Tileagă
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Discursive Psychology book series (PSDP)

Abstract

The question ‘what does coming to terms with the past mean?’ is one of the most puzzling questions in the social sciences. For some, like Theodor W. Adorno, the matter of coming to terms with the past is ‘essentially … a matter of the way in which the past is called up and made present: whether one stops at sheer reproach, or whether one endures the horror through a certain strength that comprehends even the incomprehensible’ (1986, p. 126, emphasis in original). For others, it is a matter of justice (Teitel 2000), a process of ‘overcoming the past’ at the heart of political transition (Habermas and Michnik 1994), or accountability based on historical ‘truth’ that paves the way for democratic consolidation (Tismăneanu 2008).

References

  1. Adorno, T. W. (1986). What Does Coming to Terms with the Past Mean?. In G. Hartman (Ed.), Bitburg in Moral and Political Perspective (T. Bahti & G. Hartman, Trans.). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Andreescu, G. (2013). Carturari, Opozanti si Documente: Manipularea Arhivei Securitatii. Bucuresti: Polirom.Google Scholar
  3. Andrews, M. (2007). Shaping History: Narratives of Political Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Arendt, H. (1977). Between Past and Future: Eight Exercises in Political Thought. New York: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
  5. Bartlett, F. C. (1932/1995). Remembering: A Study in Experimental and Social Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Billig, M. (1999). Freudian Repression. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Billig, M., Condor, S., Edwards, D., Gane, M., Middleton, D., & Radley, A. (1988). Ideological Dilemmas: A Social Psychology of Everyday Thinking. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  8. Blumer, H. ([1969] 1998). Symbolic Interactionism: Perspective and Method. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  9. Brockmeier, J. (2010). After the Archive: Remapping Memory. Culture & Psychology, 16, 5–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Brown, S. D. (2012). Two Minutes of Silence: Social Technologies of Public Commemoration. Theory & Psychology, 22, 234–252.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Brown, S. D., & Reavey, P. (2013). Experience and Memory. In E. Keightley & M. Pickering (Eds.), Research Methods for Memory Studies. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Brown, S. D., & Reavey, P. (2015). Vital Memory and Affect: Living with a Difficult Past. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Bruner, J. S. (1986). Actual Minds, Possible Worlds. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Bucur, M. (2009). Heroes and Victims: Remembering War in Twentieth-Century Romania. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Byford, J., & Tileagă, C. (2017). Accounts of a Troubled Past: Psychology, History, and Texts of Experience. Qualitative Psychology, 4(1), 101–117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Edwards, D. (1997). Discourse and Cognition. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  17. Frosh, S. (2010). Psychoanalysis Outside the Clinic: Interventions in Psychosocial Studies. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Gallinat, A. (2006). Difficult Stories: Public Discourse and Narrative Identity in Eastern Germany. Ethnos, 71, 343–366.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Habermas, J. (1988). Concerning the Public Use of History. New German Critique, 44, 40–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Habermas, J., & Michnik, A. (1994). Overcoming the Past. New Left Review, I/203, 3–16.Google Scholar
  21. Halbwachs, M. (1952/1992). On Collective Memory. Chicago: Chicago University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Harré, R., & Gillett, G. (1994). The Discursive Mind. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  23. Horne, C. (2017). Evaluating Measures and Their Outcomes. In L. Stan & L. Turcescu (Eds.), Justice, Memory and Redress in Romania: New Insights (pp. 45–75). Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
  24. Keightley, E., & Pickering, M. (2013). Painful Pasts. In E. Keightley & M. Pickering (Eds.), Research Methods for Memory Studies. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  25. LaCapra, D. (1994). Representing the Holocaust: History, Theory, Trauma. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Lynch, M. (1999). Archives in Formation: Privileged Spaces, Popular Archives and Paper Trails. History of the Human Sciences, 12, 65–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Mark, J. (2010). The Unfinished Revolution: Making Sense of the Communist Past in Central and Central-Eastern Europe. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Middleton, D., & Brown, S. D. (2005). The Social Psychology of Experience: Studies in Remembering and Forgetting. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  29. Nora, P. (1996). General Introduction: Between Memory and History. In P. Nora (Ed.), Realms of Memory (Vol. 1, pp. 1–20) (English language edition edited by L. D. Kritzman). New Year: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Plummer, K. (2001). Documents of Life 2: An Invitation to Critical Humanism. London: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Potter, J., & Wetherell, M. (1987). Discourse and Social Psychology: Beyond Attitudes and Behaviour. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  32. Rose, J. (2007). The Last Resistance. London: Verso.Google Scholar
  33. Rothberg, M. (2009). Multidirectional Memory: Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Rowe, S., Wertsch, J., & Kosyaeva, T. (2002). Linking Little Narratives to Big Ones: Narrative and Public Memory in History Museums. Culture & Psychology, 8, 96–112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Skinner, Q. (2002). Visions of Politics: Regarding Method (Vol. I). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Smith, D. (1974). The Social Construction of Documentary Reality. Sociological Inquiry, 44, 257–268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Smith, D. (1987). The Everyday World as Problematic: A Feminist Sociology. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
  38. Smith, D. (2004). Writing the Social: Critique, Theory and Investigations. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
  39. Stan, L. (2006). The Vanishing Truth: Politics and Memory in Post-communist Europe. East European Quarterly, 40, 383–408.Google Scholar
  40. Stan, L. (2017). Introduction. In L. Stan & L. Turcescu (Eds.), Justice, Memory and Redress in Romania: New Insights (pp. ix–xiii). Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
  41. Teitel, R. (2000). Transitional Justice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  42. Tileagă, C. (2015). The Nature of Prejudice: Society, Discrimination and Moral Exclusion. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Tismăneanu, V. (2008). Democracy and Memory: Romania Confronts Its Communist Past. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 617(1), 166–180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Valsiner, J., & van der Veer, R. (2000). The Social Mind: The Construction of an Idea. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  45. Wertsch, J. (2007). Collective Memory. In J. Valsiner & A. Rosa (Eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Sociocultural Psychology (pp. 645–660). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cristian Tileagă
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social SciencesLoughborough UniversityLoughboroughUK

Personalised recommendations