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Visualizing Mass Grave Recovery: Ritual, Digital Culture and Geographic Information Systems

  • Wendy Perla Kurtz
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Cultural Heritage and Conflict book series (PSCHC)

Abstract

Kurtz reflects on the ritualistic aspects of mourning practices that accompany the current disinterment and reburial of Francoist victims from mass graves on the Iberian Peninsula. Digital productions—blogs, YouTube shorts, social media—act as a stage for families and communities to highlight the process of locating their disappeared family members. Using theories of performance, Kurtz argues the need to actualize funeral rites before a community of witnesses as a way to disseminate memory and enact closure. Through the creation and dissemination of digital texts, performative rituals help to reconcile and recuperate collective memory. The means of dissemination of digital culture become critical and, as such, an analysis of the modalities of visualizations, particularly through digital mapping systems (GIS), concludes the chapter

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy Perla Kurtz
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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