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Perceptions on Human Security: An Indonesian View

  • Lina A. Alexandra
Chapter
Part of the Security, Development and Human Rights in East Asia book series (SDHRP)

Abstract

This chapter is based on thorough interviews with stakeholders including policymakers, ex-military officers, academics, and non-governmental organization activists. Interviewees mentioned such issues as poverty and religious intolerance as major threats to human security. The chapter examines the Constitution of Indonesia as well as various laws that contain elements related to human security. While many legal documents refer to the freedoms from want and fear and the freedom to live in dignity, none of them specifically uses the term “human security.” This may reflect a level of hesitancy among policymakers to fully embrace the concept. In Indonesia, human security is sometimes regarded as a sub-category of national security. Strong political will on the part of the government seems to be required in order to mainstream human security.

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Interviews

  1. Military Source #1. 2014. Interviewed by author in Jakarta, June 6.Google Scholar
  2. Civil Society Source #1. 2014. Interviewed by the author in Jakarta, June 16.Google Scholar
  3. Government Source #1. 2014. Interviewed by the author in Jakarta, June 6.Google Scholar
  4. Civil Society Source #2. 2014. Respondent from SMERU Research Institute. Interviewed by the author in Jakarta, June 6.Google Scholar
  5. Civil Society Source #3. 2014. Respondent from World Resources Institute (WRI). Interviewed by the author in Jakarta, May 20.Google Scholar
  6. Government Source #2. 2014. High-rank official from Ministry of Health. Interviewed by the author in Jakarta, June 30.Google Scholar
  7. Civil Society Source #4. 2014. Respondent from Migrant Care. Interviewed by the author in Jakarta, June 16.Google Scholar
  8. Government Source #3. 2014. High-ranking official previously in charge on the Rehabilitation and Reconstruction Agency for Aceh. Interviewed by the author in Jakarta, June 17.Google Scholar
  9. Civil Society Source #5. 2014. Human rights activist from Human Rights Watch. Interviewed by the author in Jakarta, June 16.Google Scholar
  10. Civil Society Source #6. 2014. Respondent from Indonesian Consortium for Religious Studies (ICRS). Interviewed by the author in Jakarta, May 20.Google Scholar
  11. Civil Society Source #7. 2014. Human rights activist from Institute for Policy Analysis of Conflict (IPAC). Interviewed by the author in Jakarta, May 20.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lina A. Alexandra
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of International RelationsCentre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)JakartaIndonesia

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