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Introduction: European Film and Television Co-production

  • Julia Hammett-Jamart
  • Petar Mitric
  • Eva Novrup Redvall
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave European Film and Media Studies book series (PEFMS)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the field of European film and television co-production and outlines the themes and methodological approaches employed within the volume European Film and Television Co-production: Policy and Practice. It describes the policy-driven European co-production model, focusing both on its historical evolution (emergence of official co-productions and proliferation of co-production treaties), and explores current developments triggered by recent tax incentives, non-official and TV co-productions, as well as digital media platforms. Furthermore, the chapter points to major methodological and theoretical gaps in the existing scholarship. To address those gaps, the chapter proposes a research methodology that would allow scholars to move closer to policy makers and practitioners, ensuring more cross-sectoral dialogue in researching co-productions.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Hammett-Jamart
    • 1
  • Petar Mitric
    • 2
  • Eva Novrup Redvall
    • 2
  1. 1.Co-production Research NetworkParisFrance
  2. 2.University of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark

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