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Connecting Theory with Action

  • Grady Walker
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Communication for Social Change book series (PSCSC)

Abstract

This chapter presents the methods of data collection and overarching research design of the study. This chapter is essential for those whose interest lies in replicating the activities described and analyzed in the book. The discussion focuses on the justification for the dual research design—case study and dialogical narrative analysis—employed for the study of the praxis. From this chapter, the reader should gain a theoretical and practical understanding of how and why the case was synthesized through a combination of different elements.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grady Walker
    • 1
  1. 1.Walker InstituteUniversity of ReadingReadingUK

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