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Perspectives on Global Issues

  • Adam B. Masters
Chapter

Abstract

Global issues are often beyond the ability of international government organization to deal with alone. They emerge unexpectedly – the controls of the internet; violently and rapidly – the threat of bio-terrorism; or they are cyclical – the privatization of cultural heritage. These examples Masters has chosen have commonalities – they are global, they require action; member-states are not necessarily in concordance on their importance; and they all require global public-private partnerships by way of response.

Keywords

Global public private partnerships Bio-terrorism Internet Cultural heritage 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adam B. Masters
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Social Research and MethodsThe Australian National UniversityActonAustralia

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