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Introducing the Case Study Organizations

  • Adam B. Masters
Chapter

Abstract

The historical background, administrative structures and partnerships of the International Telecommunication Union, Interpol and the International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property have certain path dependency. As technical organizations, diplomatic practices take the back seat as engineers, police and conservators create networks among their peers and partners. Each network has resulted in globalized telecommunications; international police-to-police cooperation; and a multi-national appreciation for the patrimony of humanity. For each organization, Masters undertakes a case-within-a-case of a sample partnership to illustrate how global public-private partnerships form and operate.

Keywords

Global public private partnerships Interpol International Telecommunication Union International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property Professional culture Organizational culture 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adam B. Masters
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Social Research and MethodsThe Australian National UniversityActonAustralia

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