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Introduction: The Impact of Education in South Asia—From Sri Lanka to Nepal

  • Helen E. Ullrich
Chapter
Part of the Anthropological Studies of Education book series (ASE)

Abstract

The introduction begins with an account of an educated Brahmin woman’s taking charge of infant immunizations as an indication of her ability to insure her family’s health. This contrasts with a non-Brahmin mother’s fear of allopathic medication for her infant daughter with pertussis. The three nations represented in this volume—Sri Lanka, India, and Nepal—all have compulsory education. However, the stark contrast between “public” (private) and government schools reveals a marked difference in educational quality for the socioeconomically comfortable and the poor. The introduction includes a discussion of the types of learning and concludes with a reflection of the geographical and social strata in the papers as representing the breadth and depth of Pauline Kolenda’s interests and contributions.

Keywords

Education Health Social stratification 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen E. Ullrich
    • 1
  1. 1.Tulane University Medical SchoolNew OrleansUSA

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