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Global Divergence and Economic Change

  • Jared Rubin
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Economic History book series (PEHS)

Abstract

An explosion in wealth occurred in Western countries in the second half of the second millennium. Meanwhile, the economies of the rest of the world remained relatively stagnant. Understanding the causes of this divergence is one of the great tasks of economic history. This chapter discusses how warfare, institutions, and culture play pivotal roles in recent theories of global divergence.

JEL Classification

O10 O40 O57 N10 N40 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jared Rubin
    • 1
  1. 1.Chapman UniversityOrangeUSA

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