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Economics Versus History

  • Christopher L. Colvin
  • Homer Wagenaar
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Economic History book series (PEHS)

Abstract

Economic history is an interdisciplinary field that fuses economics with history, two disciplines that often misunderstand one another. This chapter bridges these two disciplines by discussing archetypical approaches and research strategies in each. The authors contrast the differences between deductive, inductive and abductive reasoning in scholarly enquiry. They conclude with a call for consideration to (historical) context when conducting research in economics and economic history.

JEL Classification

A11 A12 A22 A23 B41 N01 

Reading List

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher L. Colvin
    • 1
  • Homer Wagenaar
    • 1
  1. 1.Queen’s University BelfastBelfastUK

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