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In the Market Place

  • Anna Bellavitis
Chapter

Abstract

In early modern Europe, women were highly active in retail trade in all cities: they sold the produce of their own plots of land or the fish freshly caught by their husbands; they traded in used goods or as itinerant or semi-permanent traders, a vital activity in urban economies. Specific female organisations of retailers existed in many European cities. In this area too, institutional obstacles could make trade difficult for women, but, invoking everybody’s right to survival, the authorities were also willing to turn a blind eye when women carried out activities that were beyond legality.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna Bellavitis
    • 1
  1. 1.University of RouenRouenFrance

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